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NFL Draft 2015: Chiefs select Washington CB Marcus Peters in First Round

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Peters becomes the second Husky to go in the first round.

Trevor Ruszkowski-USA TODAY Sports

Talent outweighs problems is a cliche in the NFL. Yet it is proven time and time again, this time with Washington cornerback Marcus Peters being selected by the Kansas City Chiefs in the first round of the NFL Draft, 18th overall. Peters is the second selection coming from the Huskies defense, following defensive tackle Danny Shelton, who was selected by the Cleveland Browns, 12th overall.

Peters has documented clashes with coaches and an fiery personality that he has had issues keeping under control in the past. The Chiefs believe that either those issues are in his past and he has matured, or that they have the system in place to keep his outbursts to a minimum.

Some consider Peters the best cover corner in the draft when it comes to pure talent. He is a little bit raw in the skill department, but the fourth-year junior just oozed talent and playmaking ability during his time as a Husky.

Here is an excerpt from our scouting profile of Peters:

Strengths - There are plenty. Peters is strong and physical. It shows up in run support, it shows up in tackling and not allowing receivers yards after the catch and most importantly it shows up in jams at the line of scrimmage. He will redirect or sometimes even stonewall receivers with ease. His strength and tenacity allow him to compete with bigger receivers and even outmuscle pass catchers when the ball arrives.

His physicality feeds his aggression. He is not afraid to battle a receiver for the ball, and when he does, oftentimes he will end up on the winning end of the battle with the football in his grasp. His interceptions didn't always come by way of out-physicalling his opponents. He made acrobatic plays and timed routes to make his share of "easy" interceptions as well.

Peters' coverage ability is at its best when he is able to jam at the line. From there, he has the trailing speed to prevent most receivers from beating him over the top, as well as the ability to change direction with route runners.

Congratulations Marcus!