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That huge wide receiver class

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If you trace back recruiting to 2001 you realize that Neuhesiel screwed things up by bringing in eight receivers in the 2003 class. He assumed he could make a few of them into defensive backs which destroyed depth in that area of the team because none of these guys were convertible. We will save the DB story for later.

This created a log jam of average talent and also put us in the position we are in this year with so many young receivers on the squad at the same time.

I think Willingham had his hands tied at this position, but he has done a nice job over the last two years bringing in some superior young talent. Due to Aguilar and Boyles not qualifying the Huskies still are a little heavy in the 2008 frosh class which means the Huskies will only take 1-2 in 2009.

2001 Recruiting Year

Back in 2001 the wide recever position looked pretty strong. You had Reggie Williams, and Paul Frederick coming in, Todd Elstrom, Paul Arnold, Wilbur Hooks, and Patrick Reddick were your veterans, Rick pulled in two of the best WR's in the country that year. You figued he had it going at this point and dynasty building was about to begin.

  • Reggie Williams (Blue Chip)
  • Charles Fredericks (Blue Chip)

2002 Recruiting Year (Neuhesiel)

For some reason Rick only took one WR even though Nate Williams was listed as a DB/RB/WR type. Jackson ended up transfering to West Virginia because he didn't think he got enough playing time.

  • Eddie Jackson (JC)

2003 Recruiting Year (Neuheisel)

Rick gambled figuring some of these guys could be turned into defensive backs. What happened is that he ended up log jamming the position for five years with under achieving talent in some cases, and not enough talent in others. If you spread the same number of scholarships over three-four classes you have a much better chance of success not to mention achieving balance.

This class was a huge bust led by Chambers who never put out in practice and ended up transfering. Daniels had talent but was injured most of the five years he was with the squad. Charles Smith flunked out and ended up at Central. Whithorne transferred to UCLA after being kicked off the team. Cory Williams never was consistent and never recovered from an injury suffered against Notre Dame. Shackleford and Russo had good careers but weren't all league talent. Cody Ellis flashed good speed but was never in the good graces of Willingham.

If you had divied these eight scholarships over 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 balance would have been achieved and we wouldn't be in the inexperienced pickle we are in now.

  • Craig Chambers (Blue Chip)
  • Quintin Daniels
  • Charles Smith
  • Sonny Shackleford
  • Bobby Whithorne
  • Corey Williams
  • Cody Ellis
  • Anthony Russo

2004 Recruiting Year (Gilbertson)

After Neuheisel's manic run down the WR aisle in 2003 Gilbertson passes in 2004.

2005 Recruiting Year (Willingham)

Wood had some good moments when he wasn't injured.

  • Marlon Wood (Transfer)

2006 Recruiting Year (Willingham)

Reese really never got it even though i think he made the Raiders as a free agent. Goodwin is todays go-to receiver.

  • Marcel Reese (JC)
  • D'Andre Goodwin

2007 Recruiting Year (Willingham)

This is an excellent class on paper, but Boyles and Aguilar were late qualifiers who didn't show up till January. Logan redshirted and is an on and off starter this year. Shaw started off at RB but was switched at mid season to receiver. He left the team for personal reasons. Aguilar and Logan are playing, but Boyles may end up redshirting if he doesn't play this week.

  • Anthony Boyles (Blue Chip)
  • Devin Aguilar
  • Alvin Logan
  • Curtis Shaw

2008 Husky Recruiting (Willingham)

Another great class on paper as UW got everyone they wanted. Kearse and Polk have had their moments this season. Cody Bruns was hurt late in camp and is a RS candidate. Chris Polk was moved to TB and was injured in the second game and will redshirt.

  • Jermaine Kearse
  • Cody Bruns
  • Jordan Polk
  • Chris Polk